I have an advantage because I’m the underdog and I’m black and no one thinks I’d ever win,” she said. “Well, I’m going to inspire so many people. Everybody will be talking about, how did she come up so fast? But I’m ready to shine.

Gabby Douglas / NYTimes (via emm-dash)

And to all the people claiming that Gabby’s acknowledgment of her race is “adding nothing to improving race relations”, in that she should only refer to herself as an American, need to do everyone else a favor and get a fucking grip. By attempting to ignore her racial background (all in the favor of ~colorblindness~), you are erasing the socioeconomic and racial components that forced her to leave home in order to get access to resources and opportunities that she wouldn’t have had the chance to have had she STAYED in her neighborhood. 

(via isitscary)

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You start out in 1954 by saying “Nigger, nigger, nigger.” By 1968, you can’t say “nigger” — that hurts you. Backfires. So you say stuff like “forced busing,” “states’ rights,” and all that stuff. You’re getting so abstract now that you’re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you’re talking about are totally economic things, and a byproduct of them is that blacks get hurt worse than whites.

Lee Atwater, a head republican strategist, in an anonymous interview in 1981. He is admitting that republicans use coded-language to appeal to the racists in their base. Because, as he always said, “people vote their fears.”

Lee, who would eventually become the head of the Republican National Committee, helped Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush win their Presidential elections by teaching them to use overtly-racist tactics.

When the N-word became taboo, Republicans began referring to black people in less-direct ways, with terms like “welfare queens.” They learned how to say the N-word, without saying the N-word.

Sadly, this still continues today. As seen in Newt Gingrich’s claim that Obama is a “food stamp President” and Rick Santorum’s assertion that he doesn’t “want to make black people’s lives better by giving them someone else’s money.”

(via ohdidikillthequeen)

Let me tell you something: as someone who faces sexism on a very personal level, I have no interest in politely trying to educate misogynists when we live in a culture in which their misogyny has no repercussions. Our government is introducing bill after bill of offensive, woman-hating legislation, murder is still the leading cause of [death of] pregnant women, and rape is under-prosecuted at staggering numbers. Birth control is up for debate, governors are rolling back equal pay laws, and you think I have the energy to be polite to these people?

No.

Because it doesn’t do any good. There’s no evidence that being super nice to sexists, or racists, or homophobes, or bigots of any kind will make them see the error of their ways – it’ll just make them more comfortable to be around you because you’re playing by their rules.

My blog is one of the only times these people will face any repercussions for being bigots. And you know what? They can turn off the computer and go right back out into the world where they are sexist jackasses and people tolerate it or even encourage it. When I turn off the computer, I’m still in a world of sexist jackasses that are tolerated and even encouraged. There’s this culture of not having any accountability for being a bigot, and I’ve created one tiny space on the internet where that’s no longer true.

stfusexists. (via historicalslut)

still so fucking good

(via methodistcoloringbook)

Hey I wrote that

(via stfusexists)

Within white supremacist capitalist patriarchy, forgetfulness is encouraged. When people of color remember ourselves, remember the myriad ways our cultures and communities have been ravaged by white domination, we are often told by white peers that we are “too bitter”, that we are “full of hate.” Memory sustains a spirit of resistance. Too many red and black people live in a state of forgetfulness, embracing a colonized mind so that they can better assimilate into the white world.

bell hooks

exactly

(via wretchedoftheearth)

You won’t allow me to go to school.
I won’t become a doctor.
Remember this:
One day you will be sick.

Poem written by an 11 year old Afghan girl 

This poem was recorded in a NYT magazine article about female underground poetry groups in Afghanistan. An amazing article about the ways in which women are using a traditional two line poetry form to express their resistance to male oppression, their feelings about love (considered blasphemous), and their doubts about religion. 

One of the best articles I’ve read all year. Here’s the link

(via katyuno)

I’d rather read the iTunes User Agreement.

– one of the Amazon reviewers on Fifty Shades of Grey 

(via housewifeswag)

I have a dream today, that white racists will one day use my speeches to try and get colored people to shut up, and on my birthday each year, there will be lots of black people in McDonald’s commercials.

Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. III D.D.S. (via dionthesocialist)

When, as happened recently in France, an attempt is made to coerce women out of the burqa rather than creating a situation in which a woman can choose what she wishes to do, it’s not about liberating her, but about unclothing her. It becomes an act of humiliation and cultural imperialism. It’s not about the burqa. It’s about the coercion. Coercing a woman out of a burqa is as bad as coercing her into one. Viewing gender in this way, shorn of social, political and economic context, makes it an issue of identity, a battle of props and costumes. It is what allowed the US government to use western feminist groups as moral cover when it invaded Afghanistan in 2001. Afghan women were (and are) in terrible trouble under the Taliban. But dropping daisy-cutters on them was not going to solve their problems.

Arundhati Roy (via jahanzebjz)

True gender equality is actually perceived as inequality. A group that is made up of 50% women is perceived as being mostly women. A situation that is perfectly equal between men and women is perceived as being biased in favor of women.
And if you don’t believe me, you’ve never been a married woman who kept her family name. I have had students hold that up as proof of my “sexism.”
My own brother told me that he could never marry a woman who kept her name because “everyone would know who ruled that relationship.” Perfect equality – my husband keeps his name and I keep mine – is held as a statement of superiority on my part.

– Lucy, When Worlds Collide: Fandom and Male Privilege. (via seaofbadstories)

I might have reblogged this already but it’s so good I don’t care.

(via stfufauxminists)

Kyriarchy in action.

(via transstingray)

Also the study where they had women and men talking in a discussion and when women spoke around 30% of the time, men perceived them as dominating the discussion. They didn’t consider it “equal” until something like 5-10% of women talking.

(via dumbthingswhitepplsay)

Voila. A beautiful example of why fighting for equality becomes a gross exaggeration in the eyes of the oppressors.

(via curiouslycool)

Read the whole thing. It’s very very telling, and very accurate. An excellent, spot-on piece. 

(via thearcanetheory)

One white woman raised her hand and protested, “Why are we reading about Black people? I thought this was a women’s studies class.” The professor lost her temper and told her that in case she didn’t know, it was a Black woman teaching the class and that Black people can also be women. The white woman started crying and angrily left the class. I was amazed at this white woman’s sense of entitlement and privilege, of being able to protest and cry in the classroom.

Siobhan Brooks, ”Black Feminism in Everyday Life”

The failure to grasp intersectionality that I think a lot of white feminists (and really people of every type of movement seem to miss)

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